Browse Items (27 total)

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EMDRIA has submitted comments critical of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report commissioned by the Department of Veterans Affairs to assess the scientific evidence on treatment modalities for PTSD. The 2007 report concluded that “the evidence is…

The present article is a response to R. May's commentary (see record 2005-03961-005) on our original article: "A Look at EMDR: Technique, Research and Use with College Students" (see record 2003-10645-005). May points out the controversial nature of…

No abstract available.

The role of eye movements in EMDR therapy is not yet clear. However, it is clear that Hembree and Foa's uncritical report of evidence nonsupportive of the importance of eye movement, or other sensory/motor activity in EMDR, suggests this is a closed…

Discusses the validity of a study on the efficacy of eye movement desensitization that did not follow the exact principles of EMDR as enunciated by Francine Shapiro.

It is refreshing to find he has put the emphasis on health rather than illness. To translate that in the British context, one has to question the real advance that has taken place in making that shift. It is fashionable to call every service in terms…

Tack för ditt påpekande om oriktigheter i en patientbroschyr. Vi ska självfallet rätta till dessa. Samtidigt vill jag kommentera några av dina påståenden. Thank you for your comment about irregularities in a patient brochure. we will obviously…

EMDR is presented by its founder [Shapiro] as a method for allowing long delayed learning to take place through as yet unknown neural mechanisms which are triggered by the repetitive eye movements of the procedure. In Stekete and Goldstein's…

Letter to the editor commenting on an article by E. Ernst (see record 2003-05653-002). We report the case of a patient who was effectively treated for severe obsessive compulsive disorder but relapsed briefly following ingestion of herbal products…

Reply by the current author to the comments made by E.M. Corrigan and J. Jennett (see record 2004-16054-010) on the original article (see record 2003-05653-002). They describe a 29-year-old woman with an obsessive compulsive disorder relapse…

Dr. Shapiro elucidates further on the therapeutic procedure eye movement desensitization.

Comments on the article by J. G. Carlson et al (see record 84-01737) regarding the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment (EMDR) to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Vietnam veterans. The author suggests that EMDR…

The Maxfield, Lake, and Hyer acerbic attack on my review is filled with fallacies and inaccurate and unwarranted accusations that deflect attention away from the main issue pertaining to the insufficient evidence base for current claims that EMDR is…

Pitman et al. recently published a pair of studies on the relationship between indicators of emotional processing and outcome in flooding therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. Among their conclusions, they asserted…

Replies to the comments by H. Lipke (see record 2002-12440-004) concerning the article by G. J. Devilly (see record 2001-18447-002) which discussed distraction during exposure. The author presents evidence that he feels will help an audience reach…

This commentary raises questions about how we assess therapeutic techniques. In particular, it critiques a recent paper promoting EMDR for use with college students.

Author points out a propensity among some professionals to respond unfairly to data supporting EMDR, and he calls for open-minded critical analysis of available data.

This section of the newsletter includes letters to the editor regarding eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Dr. John N. Marquis states that EMDR has more controlled studies than any other treatment of PTSD including drugs. He also…

In his commentary on my article comparing Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) with animal magnetism therapy, Greenwald (this issue) expresses several criticisms. Unable to refute a single factual statement, he resorts to attacking my…

Rosen argues that the eye movements experienced by Shapiro during the incident leading to her development of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) could not, as she later inferred, have been saccadic. The present author disputes…

In summary, we submit that the evidence cited by Lipke in support of the proposal that eye movements contribute to treatment outcome does not meet the burden of proof. Specifically, eye movements and other laterally alternating stimuli have not been…

Lipke's criticisms of the experiment reported by Bates and colleagues are without merit. Data from the experiment show either that the procedure was sound or that the clinical measurement reported by eye-movement densitization (EMD) therapists is…

I am writing in response to Baer, Hurley, Minichiello, Ott, Penzel, and Riccardi letter of May, 1992, (the Behavior Therapist, Vol. 15, 5, p. 110) about the EMDR workshop conducted at the AABT Convention, November, 1991.

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EMDR produces extraordinarily rapid results. Therapists across the country are reporting success with Vietnam veterans, incest victims and other survivors of trauma. This article describes its successful use in curing sexual problems attributed to…

Replies to the comments by L. Waters (see record 84-36309) on the article by J. G. Carlson et al (see record 84-01737) regarding the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment (EMDR) to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)…

Welch's (Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 27, 175-179, 1996) response to Rosen's (Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 26, 121-122, 1995) limited study on the origin of eye movement desensitization and…
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