EMDR and phantom limb pain:  Theoretical implications, case study, and treatment guidelines

Description

This article reviews the literature on EMDR treatment of somatic complaints and describes the application of Shapiro's Adaptive Information Processing (AIP) model in the treatment of phantom limb pain. The case study explores the use of EMDR with a 38-year-old man experiencing severe phantom limb pain 3 years after the loss of his leg and part of his pelvis in an accident. Despite treatment at several rehabilitation and pain centers during the 3 years, and the use of opiate medication, he continued to experience persistent pain. After 9 EMDR treatment sessions, the patient's phantom limb pain was completely ablated, and he was taken off medication. Effects were maintained at 18-month follow-up. The clinical implications of this application of EMDR are explored.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Jens Schneider
Arne Hofmann
Christine Rost
Francine Shapiro

Original Work Citation

Schneider, J., Hofmann, A., Rost, C., & Shapiro, F. (2007). EMDR and phantom limb pain: Theoretical implications, case study, and treatment guidelines. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 1(1), 31-45. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.1.1.31

Collection

Citation

“EMDR and phantom limb pain:  Theoretical implications, case study, and treatment guidelines,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 27, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/15334.

Output Formats