A meditation on the nature of self-healing and personality change in psychotherapy based on Gendlin's theory of experiencing

Description

From a humanistic point of view psychotherapy is a creative transformational process in which therapists assist clients’ intrinsic self‐healing tendencies. However the nature of the self‐healing process is poorly understood. I briefly consider two theories of self‐healing, Rogers’ self‐actualization theory and dialectical theory, but focus on Gendlin's theory of experiencing as providing a more complete explanation. I consider the fundamentally implicational nature of change and portray personal change as “paradigm evolution” rather than paradigm revolution. I conclude with an examination of the self‐healing process in therapies that provide minimal prosthetic assistance to the client: client‐centered therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and focusing‐oriented therapy. I conclude that the self‐healing/self‐change process occurs when intellectual, “top‐down” cognitive and self‐critical activity is interrupted, and when clients adopt a receptive, listening attitude towards inner experience.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Arthur C. Bohart

Original Work Citation

Bohart, A. C. (2001). A meditation on the nature of self-healing and personality change in psychotherapy based on Gendlin's theory of experiencing. Humanistic Psychologist, 29(1-3), 249-279. doi:10.1080/08873267.2001.9977016

Collection

Citation

“A meditation on the nature of self-healing and personality change in psychotherapy based on Gendlin's theory of experiencing,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed May 31, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16015.

Output Formats