EMDR therapy following the 9/11 terrorist attacks: A community-based intervention project in New York City

Description

This article presents the results of a time-limited psychological relief effort using eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Clients made highly significant positive gains on a range of outcome variables, including validated psychometrics and self-report scales. Analyses of the data suggest 2 broad conclusions: EMDR is a useful treatment intervention both in the immediate aftermath of disaster as well as later; the longer treatment is delayed, the greater the level of disturbance experienced by clients. Also discussed are problems in conducting research during mass disaster response situations. A demonstration of an analog to a wait-list control group is provided.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Steven M. Silver
Susan Rogers
Jim Knipe
Gina Colelli

Original Work Citation

Silver, S. M., Rogers, S., Knipe, J., & Colelli, G. (2005, February). EMDR therapy following the 9/11 terrorist attacks: A community-based intervention project in New York City. International Journal of Stress Management, 12(1), 29-42. doi:10.1037/1072-5245.12.1.29

Collection

Citation

“EMDR therapy following the 9/11 terrorist attacks: A community-based intervention project in New York City,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 24, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16030.

Output Formats