The empirical status of the clinical application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing

Description

The published reports of the clinical application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) are reviewed in terms of empirical validity. Case studies, single-subject experiments and group design experiments on clinical problems are evaluated for the effectiveness of the protocol, component effects, comparative effects and treatment fidelity. Classification of disorders and measurement issues are addressed. The protocol frequently reduces verbal report and independent observer ratings of distress - strikingly in some instances. Psychophysiologic measures show little effect of treatment. There is little empirical evidence to indicate the effect of treatment on motoric or behavioral indices. Eye movements do not appear to be an essential component of treatment, and there have been no substantial comparisons with other treatments. No studies have adequately controlled for nonspecific (placebo) effects of treatment. Suggestions are made for applying improved methodological controls for future applications of EMDR to clinical disorders.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Jeffrey Lohr
Ronald Kleinknecht
David Tolin
Richard Barrett

Original Work Citation

Lohr, J., Kleinknecht, R., Tolin, D., & Barrett, R. (1995, December). The empirical status of the clinical application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 26(4), 285-302. doi:10.1016/0005-7916(95)00041-0

Collection

Citation

“The empirical status of the clinical application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed March 7, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16102.

Output Formats