Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of test anxiety:  A study of the effects of expectancy and eye movement

Description

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recently invented technique acclaimed as a major breakthrough for a range of anxiety-related symptoms. To determine the importance of the eye movement and expectancy variables, we conducted a one-hour session with 41 undergraduate subjects (11 males and 30 females) with test anxiety. A 2 (eye movement vs no eye movement) x 2 (high expectancy vs low expectancy) analysis of variance was performed on 3 dependent measures: (1) Subjective Units of Disturbance Scale (SUDs); (2) Validity of Cognition Scale (VOC); and (3) the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI). The data indicate that all subjects, regardless of treatment condition, showed a significant decrease in anxiety on the TAI. Subjects in the eye-movement condition reported feeling less anxious (SUDs) than those in the no-eye-movement condition. We found no significant main effect or interactions for any of the dependent measures for expectancy.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Phillip Gosselin
William J. Matthews

Original Work Citation

Gosselin, P., & Matthews, W. J. (1995, December). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of test anxiety: A study of the effects of expectancy and eye movement. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 26(4), 331-337. doi:10.1016/0005-7916(95)00038-0

Collection

Citation

“Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of test anxiety:  A study of the effects of expectancy and eye movement,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 17, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16104.

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