Measuring effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in non-clinical anxiety:  A multi-subject, yoked-control design

Description

28 subjects from a university's subject pool were paired on sex, age, severity, and type of stressful or traumatic incident. 1 subject in each pair was selected to receive EMDR; the experimental partner spent the same amount of time receiving a visual (non-movement) placebo. Subjective units of discomfort (SUD) scores and physiological measurements were taken prior to and following treatment. Analysis of physiological measurements and self-reported levels of stress were performed within and between each group. While the EMDR group showed significant reductions of stress, EMDR was no better than a placebo. This suggests EMDR's specific intervention involving eye movement may not be a necessary component of the treatment protocol.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Thomas M. Dunn
Marvin Schwartz
Robert W. Hatfield
Mark Wiegele

Original Work Citation

Dunn, T. M., Schwartz, M., Hatfield, R. W., & Wiegele, M. (1996, September). Measuring effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in non-clinical anxiety: A multi-subject, yoked-control design. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 27(3), 231-239. doi:10.1016/S0005-7916(96)00034-1

Collection

Citation

“Measuring effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in non-clinical anxiety:  A multi-subject, yoked-control design,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 22, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16110.

Output Formats