Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment for combat PTSD:  Commentary

Description

Comments on the article by J. G. Carlson et al (see record 84-01737) regarding the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment (EMDR) to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Vietnam veterans. The author suggests that EMDR seems simplistic and lacks face validity altogether. L. Waters proposes that EMDR works because of resolute perception, a process defined by F. J. Hanna and K. Puhakka (1991) as a deliberate sustained focus of attention on an identified problem with the goal of achieving clarity, at a point when the client is ready and willing to confront and perceive. Waters suggest that a way to test whether or not EMDR works because of resolute perception would be to assign a similar group of clients to a totally different task (e.g., drawing straight lines) while giving them the same instructions as are given in EMDR regarding their memories, thoughts, and desirable cognitions.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Linda Waters

Original Work Citation

Waters, L. (1997, Spring). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment for combat PTSD: Commentary. Psychotherapy:Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 34(1), 99. doi:10.1037/h0087777

Collection

Citation

“Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment for combat PTSD:  Commentary,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 27, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16215.

Output Formats