Use of EMDR in the treatment of water phobia at Navy boot camp:  A case study

Description

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) has become one of the most scientifically researched mental health treatments in the world; yet little has been done specifically with active-duty service members. Initially used in the treatment of anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder, it has since become popular in the treatment of addictions, relationship problems, eating disorders, panic attacks, phobias, and mood disorders. This article expands the current study of EMDR through the use of a case study approach. Specifically, it provides a detailed case study of the treatment of water phobia experienced by a U.S. Navy recruit. The unique stressors and time pressures of the recruit training environment are discussed. A detailed account of the therapist’s adherence to the eight phases of the EMDR protocol is woven in to the case study. Although the efficacy research of EMDR in the treatment of specific phobias is mixed, this article demonstrates how EMDR can be effectively utilized to treat trauma-based phobias in a time-sensitive and pressure-based environment such as that of recruit training in the United States Navy.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Michael D. Howard
Ruth P. Cox

Original Work Citation

Howard, M. D., & Cox, R. P. (2006, December). Use of EMDR in the treatment of water phobia at Navy boot camp: A case study. Traumatology, 12(4), 302-313. doi:10.1177/1534765606297821

Collection

Citation

“Use of EMDR in the treatment of water phobia at Navy boot camp:  A case study,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed July 6, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16255.

Output Formats