Treatment of specific phobias with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR):  Protocol, empirical status, and conceptual issues

Description

This paper considers the current empirical status of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) as a treatment method for specific phobias, along with some conceptual and practical issues in relation to its use. Both uncontrolled and controlled studies on the application of EMDR with specific phobias demonstrate that EMDR can produce significant improvements within a limited number of sessions. With regard to the treatment of childhood spider phobia, EMDR has been found to be more effective than a placebo control condition, but less effective than exposure in vivo. The empirical support for EMDR with specific phobias is still meagre, therefore, one should remain cautious. However, given that there is insufficient research to validate any method for complex or trauma related phobias, that EMDR is a time-limited procedure, and that it can be used in cases for which an exposure in vivo approach is difficult to administer, the application of EMDR with specific phobias merits further clinical and research attention.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Ad de Jongh
Erik ten Broeke
Monique Renssen

Original Work Citation

de Jongh, A., ten Broeke, E., & Renssen, M. (1999, January-April). Treatment of specific phobias with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR): Protocol, empirical status, and conceptual issues. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 13(1-2), 69-85. doi:10.1016/S0887-6185(98)00040-1

Collection

Citation

“Treatment of specific phobias with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR):  Protocol, empirical status, and conceptual issues,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed June 18, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16428.

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