A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disordered sexual assault victims

Description

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is a new method developed to treat PTSD. This study evaluated the efficacy of EMDR compared to a no-treatment wait-list control in the treatment of PTSD in adult female sexual assault victims. 21 subjects were entered and 18 completed. Treatment was delivered in 4 weekly individual sessions. Assessments were conducted pre- and posttreatment and 3 months following treatment termination by an independent assessor kept blind to treatment condition. Measures included standard clinician- and self-administered PTSD and related psychopathology scales. Results indicated that subjects treated with EMDR improved significantly more on PTSD and depression from pre- to posttreatment than control subjects, leading to the conclusion that EMDR was effective in alleviating PTSD in this study.

Format

Newsletter

Language

English

Author(s)

Barbara O. Rothbaum

Original Work Citation

Rothbaum, B. O. (1997, Summer). A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disordered sexual assault victims. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 61(3), 317-334

Collection

Citation

“A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disordered sexual assault victims,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 27, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/16917.

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