Research on social work practice does not benefit from blurry theory:  A response to Tomi Gomory

Description

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a well-supported evidence-based psychosocial treatment that clinically and significantly helps clients meeting the DSM criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Dozens of well-controlled clinical trials and dozens of single-subject studies bear this out, many designed and conducted by social workers. Most of these studies have involved Caucasian clients, a few used African Americans. But both groups seem to respond well, as do both males and females. Suppose a social worker has a new client from Mongolia with OCD. Falsificationism may well be the strongest approach to scientific inquiry regarding the validity of theories. The American Psychiatric Association used the following types of evidence in developing its practice guidelines: a randomized clinical trial, prospectively designed with double-blind assessments and treatment and control groups, a clinical trial, similarly prospective, but lacking blind assessments or control groups, cohort or longitudinal studies and case-control studies, retrospective studies of clients.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Bruce A. Thyer

Original Work Citation

Thyer, B. A. (2001, January). Research on social work practice does not benefit from blurry theory: A response to Tomi Gomory. Journal of Social Work Education, 37(1), 51-66

Collection

Citation

“Research on social work practice does not benefit from blurry theory:  A response to Tomi Gomory,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed August 4, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17103.

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