Empirical evidence regarding behavioral treatments for PTSD

Description

EMDR involves having the patient bring to mind images of the trauma while engaging in back-and-forth eye movements (or while alternating oneâs attention back and forth using taps or sounds). It also addresses trauma-related negative beliefs. It has been shown to be more effective than psychodynamic, relaxation, supportive, or placebo wait list therapies (where patients are put on a waiting list to receive treatment but don't actually receive it by the time they are tested). Research comparing EMDR to the more generally accepted cognitive-behavioral techniques shows significantly better results with CBT than with EMDR, particularly at three-month follow-up. CBT results also show greater sustainability. Research looking at the different components of EMDR shows that the eye movement component adds no additional treatment effect to the imagery exposure and the process of dealing with negative beliefs.

Format

Other

Language

English

Author(s)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD

Original Work Citation

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD. (2001). Empirical evidence regarding behavioral treatments for PTSD. Washington, DC

Collection

Citation

“Empirical evidence regarding behavioral treatments for PTSD,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed July 16, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17347.

Output Formats