Sexual abuse survivors’ perceptions of the effectiveness of EMDR and eclectic therapy

Description

Objective: This article examines survivor perspectives of the effectiveness of two different treatments for trauma symptoms among adult female survivors of childhood sexual abuse -- Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and eclectic therapy. Method: Qualitative interviews obtained in the context of a mixed-methods study were conducted with 38 adult female survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Results: Two major differences in outcomes between the two treatment approaches were observed. There were considerable distinctions between the two treatment groups in terms of the importance and effect of the client-therapist relationship, and in terms of the depth of change reportedly caused by the different therapies. Conclusions: Survivors' narratives indicate that EMDR produces greater trauma resolution, while within eclectic therapy, survivors more highly value their relationship with their therapist, through whom they learn effective coping strategies.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Tonya Edmond
Lacey Sloan
Dawn McCarty

Original Work Citation

Edmond, T., Sloan, L., & McCarty, D. (2004, July). Sexual abuse survivors: perceptions of the effectiveness of EMDR and eclectic therapy. Research on Social Work Practice, 14(4), 259-272. doi:10.1177/1049731504265830

Collection

Citation

“Sexual abuse survivors’ perceptions of the effectiveness of EMDR and eclectic therapy,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 26, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17389.

Output Formats