The relationships among expectancy, hypnotizability, and treatment outcome associated with eye movement desensitization in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder

Description

Two treatments: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) or structured writing sessions. A standardized diagnostic interview was used to screen subjects and provide diagnosis and symptom profile at intake and one-month follow-up. Standardized self-report measures were used to assess treatment outcomes. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the two treatments. Both treatments were effective in significantly reducing post-traumatic symptoms at post-test and follow-up, although slightly different patterns were evident. EMDR subjects tended to evidence a larger reduction in symptoms immediately after treatment, while subjects assigned to the writing condition evidenced more gradual improvement, which continued between post-test and follow-up periods. Measures of subject expectations regarding treatment effectiveness revealed no statistical correlation to treatment outcome. Similarly, hypnotic susceptibility was found to be unrelated to the effectiveness of either treatment.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Lisa Kimberly Largo-Marsh

Original Work Citation

Largo-Marsh, L. K. (1997, January). The relationships among expectancy, hypnotizability, and treatment outcome associated with eye movement desensitization in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, 57(7-B), 4714

Collection

Citation

“The relationships among expectancy, hypnotizability, and treatment outcome associated with eye movement desensitization in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed April 7, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17532.

Output Formats