Effect of bilateral eye movements on frontal interhemispheric gamma EEG coherence: Implications for EMDR therapy

Description

The use of bilateral eye movements (EMs) is an important component of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy for PTSD. The neural mechanisms underlying EMDR remain unclear. However, prior behavioral work looking at the effects of bilateral EMs on the retrieval of episodic memories suggests that the EMs enhance interhemispheric interaction. The present study examined the effects of the EMs used in EMDR on interhemispheric electroencephalogram coherence. Relative to noneye-movement controls, engaging in bilateral EMs led to decreased interhemispheric gamma electroencephalogram coherence. Implications for future work on EMDR and episodic memory are discussed.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Ruth E. Propper
Jenna Pierce
Mark W. Geisler
Stephen D. Christman
Nathan Bellorado

Original Work Citation

Propper, R. E., Pierce, J., Geisler, M. W., Christman, S. D., & Bellorado, N. (2007, September). Effect of bilateral eye movements on frontal interhemispheric gamma EEG coherence: Implications for EMDR therapy. Journal of Nervous Mental Disorders, 195(9), 785-788. doi:10.1097/NMD.0b013e318142cf73

Collection

Citation

“Effect of bilateral eye movements on frontal interhemispheric gamma EEG coherence: Implications for EMDR therapy,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 31, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17599.

Output Formats