Treating traumatic amputation-related phantom limb pain: A case study utilizing eye movement desensitization and reprocessing within the Armed Services

Description

Since September 2006, more than 725 service members from the global war on terrorism have survived combat-related traumatic amputations that often result in phantom limb pain (PLP) syndrome. Combat amputees are also at high risk of developing chronic mental health conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and clinical depression as they deal with wartime experiences, rehabilitation, and postrehabilitation adjustments. One active-duty patient was referred to a military outpatient clinic for treatment of PLP and PTSD following a traumatic leg amputation from a noncombat-related motor vehicle accident. Four sessions of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) led to elimination of PLP and a significant reduction in PTSD, depression, and phantom limb tingling sensations. A detailed account of this treatment, as well as a review of the benefits of EMDR research and treatment in the military, is provided. The results are promising but in need of further research.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Mark C. Russell

Original Work Citation

Collection

Citation

“Treating traumatic amputation-related phantom limb pain: A case study utilizing eye movement desensitization and reprocessing within the Armed Services,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 22, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17698.

Output Formats