Analyzing individual patterns of change in two treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder

Description

Two therapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have received considerable support in the clinical literature: prolonged imaginal exposure (PE) and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Although PE is empirically supported, its critics purport that it causes symptom exacerbation. In contrast, proponents of EMDR claim that its response pattern is characterized by rapid decline in symptoms. The current investigation aimed to study and compare the patterns of symptom change during PE and EMDR using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). HLM avoids many shortcomings inherent in traditional longitudinal analyses by focusing on trajectories of change rather than group means. 62 women with PTSD following rape were randomly assigned to 9 sessions of PE or EMDR. Results indicated that neither group experienced symptom exacerbation nor rapid symptom decline. The patterns of symptom change in the two groups were not significantly different. The strengths and limitations of HLM and the studys design were discussed.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Amy Lynne Selvig

Original Work Citation

Selvig, A. L. (2004). Analyzing individual patterns of change in two treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder. (Master's thesis, University of Georgia). Retrieved from https://getd.libs.uga.edu/pdfs/selvig_amy_l_200408_ms/selvig_amy_l_200408_ms.pdf

Collection

Citation

“Analyzing individual patterns of change in two treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 29, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17875.

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