Eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) and clinical hypnosis (CH): Possible role of melatonin in the attenuation of trauma

Description

Eye movement desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), also called by some EMD or EMD/R, is a relatively new therapeutic procedure. This therapeutically beneficial procedure was originally designed and envisaged for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by Dr. Francine Shapiro (Shapiro, 1989, a,b). Various subsequent studies showed that -4 sessions (ach of ½ to 2 hrs duration) of EMDR are effective in significantly reducing the traumatic memories and associated anxiety to negligible levels (Lipke & Botkin, 1992; Shapiro, 1989 a,b; Spector & Huthwaite, 1993). There are, however, scanty reports of lack of treatment outcome with EMDR which has been explained by the client’s lack of cooperation in following the procedure or the therapist’s lack of experience (Lipke & Botkin, 1992). Similar reports are available with many other effective therapeutic procedures including clinical hypnosis (CH), mainly where there is “fear of failure” or “anxiety to succeed” present in the client’s mind, in addition to lack of experience of the therapist (Hartland, 1982).

Format

Book Section

Language

English

Author(s)

Purna C. Datta

Original Work Citation

Datta, P. C. (1995). Eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) and clinical hypnosis (CH): Possible role of melatonin in the attenuation of trauma. In G. D. Burrows & R. Stanley, (Eds.) Contemporary international hypnosis (pp. 177-188). New York, NY: Wiley

Collection

Citation

“Eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) and clinical hypnosis (CH): Possible role of melatonin in the attenuation of trauma,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 26, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17899.

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