Humiliation-trauma that has been overlooked: An analysis based on fieldwork in Germany, Rwanda/Burundi, and Somalia

Description

What differentiates trauma from humiliation? This is one of the questions this article tries to answer. Trauma may occur without humiliation, as in the case of natural disaster, however, humiliation may be the core agent of trauma. Furthermore, this paper suggests that the role and significance of humiliation for traumatic experiences has long been overlooked by researchers and practitioners. The paper highlights the macro-historical backdrop for this neglect. It is the unfolding of human rights as opposed to more traditional honour codes at all levels of society both national and international. This change is a major force in making the category of trauma increasingly important, and in moving such practices as `breaking the will of the child,' that were once legitimate and even prescribed, into the category of trauma. The paper also addresses the fact that social science is part of this transition and would benefit from making more visible how it is deeply interlinked with this process.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Evelin Gerda Lindner

Original Work Citation

Lindner, E. G. (2001, March). Humiliation-trauma that has been overlooked: An analysis based on fieldwork in Germany, Rwanda/Burundi, and Somalia. Traumatology, 7(1), 43-68. doi:10.1177/153476560100700104

Collection

Citation

“Humiliation-trauma that has been overlooked: An analysis based on fieldwork in Germany, Rwanda/Burundi, and Somalia,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 25, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/17921.

Output Formats