Meeting military mental health needs in the 21st century and beyond: A critical analysis of the effects of dualism, disparity and scientific bias

Description

Since 2001, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have caused considerable strain on military medicine to effectively manage the large and growing mental health demand from deployed personnel. Current trends, initiatives and on-going barriers in meeting war-related mental health needs for this and future war generations as reported by military officials, including the 2007 Department of Defense’s (DoD) Task Force on Mental Health, is reviewed including training of providers, access to high quality mental health assessment and treatments and research innovations. Lastly, a model for a 21st century modern military mental health care system is proposed within the context of historical and present-day analysis of the cyclical impact of dualistic approaches toward mental and physical health and consequent effects of mental health stigma and disparity. Authors’ note: The findings and opinions expressed are the authors’ alone and are not intended to represent the views of the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, or the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Format

Conference

Language

English

Author(s)

Mark Russell

Original Work Citation

Russell, M. (2008, September). Meeting military mental health needs in the 21st century and beyond: A critical analysis of the effects of dualism, disparity and scientific bias. Presentation at the 13th EMDR International Association Conference, Phoenix, AZ

Collection

Tags

Citation

“Meeting military mental health needs in the 21st century and beyond: A critical analysis of the effects of dualism, disparity and scientific bias,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 27, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18204.

Output Formats