Using EMDR with survivors of sexual abuse perpetrated by roman catholic priests

Description

This paper is based upon a qualitative study which investigated the experiences of survivors of sexual abuse perpetrated by Roman Catholic Priests. The premise of the research was based upon a perceived assumption that such a distinct form of sexual traumatology generates unique trauma characteristics not accounted for within the existing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder conceptual frameworks (DSM-IV.TR; ICD-10). In making sense of survivors experiences evidence arose which indicated the majority of the research participants considered ‘God’ to have been integral within the abuse, manipulated either by design or default by the perpetrator. These idiosyncratic trauma characteristic created significant anxiety and distress in areas such as theological belief, crisis of faith and fears surrounding participant’s own mortality. This paper will outline a particular case of a survivor of such sexual abuse and their experience of EMDR discussing the ways in which such sexual traumatology is both similar and different to other survivor’s experiences and will critically consider the potential effectiveness of using EMDR with this particular client group.

Format

Conference

Language

English

Author(s)

Derek Farrell

Original Work Citation

Farrell, D. (2008, June). Using EMDR with survivors of sexual abuse perpetrated by roman catholic priests. Poster presented at the 9th EMDR Europe Association Conference, London, England

Collection

Citation

“Using EMDR with survivors of sexual abuse perpetrated by roman catholic priests,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 29, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18243.

Output Formats