Teaching trauma-related insight improves attitudes and behaviors toward challenging clients

Description

Effective dissemination of treatment methods requires not only training in high-profile interventions but also in cases of conceptualization and treatment planning skills that facilitate use of the interventions. In a series of six studies, the authors tested one training module with 303 paraprofessionals and mental health professionals in various training settings and five countries. Participants completed self-report ratings in response to a challenging acting-out client, both before and after completing a trauma-informed case-formulation exercise. The training intervention led participants to report decreased distress while considering challenging work-related scenarios, increased empathy and caring toward challenging clients, and increased comfort and confidence in their helping roles. In the final two studies, a trauma-informed treatment planning module was added, yielding additional benefit. At follow-up participants reported that the effects persisted and led to improved behaviors toward the clients. Such empirical validation of training methodologies can lead to more reliably effective dissemination.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Ricky Greenwald
Eugene Maguin
Nancy J. Smyth
Hanneli Greenwald
Karen G. Johnston
Robert L. Weiss

Original Work Citation

Greenwald, R., Maguin, E., Smyth, N. J., Greenwald, H., Johnston, K. G., & Weiss, R. L. (2008, June). Teaching trauma-related insight improves attitudes and behaviors toward challenging clients. Traumatology, 14(2), 1-11. doi:10.1177/1534765608315635

Collection

Citation

“Teaching trauma-related insight improves attitudes and behaviors toward challenging clients,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 25, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18411.

Output Formats