Somatic experiencing treatment with tsunami survivors in Thailand: Broadening the scope of early intervention

Description

This exploratory study examines the treatment effects of brief (1 to 2 sessions) Somatic Experiencing with 53 adult and child survivors of the 2004 tsunami in Thailand. Somatic Experiencing’s early-intervention model, now called Trauma First Aide, was provided 1 month after the tsunami. Survivor assessments were done pretreatment, immediately posttreatment, 3 to 5 days posttreatment, and at the 1-year follow-up. Results indicate that immediately following treatment, 67% of participants had partial to complete improvement in reported symptoms and 95% had complete or partial improvement in observed symptoms. At the 1-year follow-up, 90% of participants had complete or partial improvement in reported symptoms, and 96% had complete or partial improvement in initially observed symptoms. Given the small sample size and lack of an equivalent comparison group, results must be interpreted with caution. Nonetheless, the results suggest that integrative mind–body interventions have promise in disaster treatment.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

M. Laurie Leitch

Original Work Citation

Leitch, M. L. (2007, September). Somatic experiencing treatment with tsunami survivors in Thailand: Broadening the scope of early intervention. Traumatology, 13(3), 11-20. doi:10.1177/1534765607305439

Collection

Citation

“Somatic experiencing treatment with tsunami survivors in Thailand: Broadening the scope of early intervention,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed December 3, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18420.

Output Formats