Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR): Historical context, recent research, and future directions

41SQwOYKn9L__SX388_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Description

I here only briefly review the 8 treatment phases of which EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is compromised. The remainder of this contribution reviews the current state of EMDR research and clinical practice. Specifically, I (a) explore the historical context in which EMDR is placed, (b) review the extant publications and emerging research on this method, (c) make some suggestions for clinicians who are offering or evaluating new innovations, and (d) describe some recent clinical applications of EMDR. The earlier controversy that swirled around EMDR appears symptomatic of a lamentable split between practicing therapists and researchers (usually academic) which has manifested itself in professional psychology in a variety of ways. Because of its visibility, EMDR may well prove a vehicle to help close this gap. Hopefully, the experience of offering EMDR to the field of psychology provides lessons that will prove useful to practicing clinicians and future innovators.

Format

Book Section

Language

English

Author(s)

Francine Shapiro

Original Work Citation

Shapiro, F. (1998). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR): Historical context, recent research, and future directions. In L. Vandecreek, S. Knapp, & T. L. Jackson (Eds.), Innovations in clinical practice: A source book (pp. 143-162). Sarasosta, FL: Professional Resource Press

Collection

Citation

“Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR): Historical context, recent research, and future directions,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 28, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18466.

Output Formats