EMDR and the adaptive information processing model: Potential mechanisms of change

Description

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is a therapeutic approach guided by the adaptive information processing (AIP) model. This article provides a brief overview of some of the major precepts of AIP. The basis of clinical pathology is hypothesized to be dysfunctionally stored memories, with therapeutic change resulting from the processing of these memories within larger adaptive networks. Unlike extinction-based exposure therapies, memories targeted in EMDR are posited to transmute during processing and are then again stored by a process of reconsolidation. Therefore, a comparison and contrast to extinction-based information processing models and treatment is provided, including implications for clinical practice. Throughout the article a variety of mechanisms of action are discussed, including those inferred by tenets of the AIP model, and the EMDR procedures themselves, including the bilateral stimulation. Research suggestions are offered in order to investigate various hypotheses.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Roger M. Solomon
Francine Shapiro

Original Work Citation

Solomon, R. M., & Shapiro, F. (2008). EMDR and the adaptive information processing model: Potential mechanisms of change. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 2(4), 315-325. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.2.4.315

Collection

Citation

“EMDR and the adaptive information processing model: Potential mechanisms of change,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 19, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18485.

Output Formats