The role of critical thinking skills in practicing psychologists' theoretical orientation and choice of intervention techniques

Description

Over the past two decades, professional psychology has witnessed a growing movement towards the utilization of psychotherapies that have empirical support. Despite this development, therapies that have not been empirically supported continue to experience widespread use. Concurrently, a collection of novel interventions, known as Power/Energy therapies (P/ET’s), has emerged. Although these therapies are based on questionable theoretical foundations and enjoy little or no empirical support, their popularity with clinicians appears to be strong and growing. There is scant research examining individual differences with respect to the practice habits of professional psychologists. The present study examined whether critical thinking skills are a factor in psychologists’ choice of therapeutic interventions, including their use of P/ET’s. As hypothesized, participants who reported using a number of techniques from Power and Energy therapies scored significantly lower on a measure of critical thinking skills. Also as hypothesized, individuals who reported using a number of cognitive-behavioral techniques scored significantly higher on the measure of critical thinking skills. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Ian Randolph Sharp

Original Work Citation

Sharp, I. R. (2003, August). The role of critical thinking skills in practicing psychologists' theoretical orientation and choice of intervention techniques. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B. Sciences and Engineering, 64(11), 5802

Collection

Citation

“The role of critical thinking skills in practicing psychologists' theoretical orientation and choice of intervention techniques,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed August 8, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18524.

Output Formats