Training, treatment access, and research on trauma intervention in the armed services

Description

Since 2001, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have caused considerable strain on military medicine to effectively manage the growing mental health demand from deployed personnel. This article examines the ability of the U.S. Department of Defense to provide quality mental health services based on the availability of (a) clinical training, (b) mental health interventions, and (c) funded research of treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder. While notable progress has been made in cognitive-behavioral treatment access and research, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing is far less available—perhaps attributable to ongoing controversy over the technique. We suggest that underserved veterans would benefit from increased availability of evidence-based behavioral treatments, perhaps through continuation of a recent regional training program.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Mark C. Russell
Fred Friedberg

Original Work Citation

Russell, M. C., & Friedberg, F. (2009). Training, treatment access, and research on trauma intervention in the armed services. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 3(1), 24-31. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.3.1.24

Collection

Citation

“Training, treatment access, and research on trauma intervention in the armed services,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed January 26, 2022, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18588.

Output Formats