Promoting health: Challenges for person-centered communication in psychotherapy, counseling and human relationships in daily life

Description

For person-centered psychotherapy and counseling to be scientifically acknowledged and accepted by public health services, the following are required: (a) more empirical research on the effectiveness of person-centered therapy for different diagnostic categories (ICD-10) and counseling modes (group, family, health-related counseling); (b) incorporation of alternative interventions to increase the effectiveness of short-term person-centered psychotherapy consistent with the approach and the client-centered behavior of the therapist, such as having patients choose their therapists, providing written information on stress reduction and self-help, teaching daily relaxation exercises, using EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) with minor anxiety, and suggesting homework assignments; (c) improvement of the therapist-patient relationship via regular written feedback from the patient for the therapist, reflections that incorporate cognitions and emotions in proportion to clients' expressions, and active, intensive (non-directive) efforts by the therapist to improve the therapeutic relationship; and (d) promotion of person-centered behaviors by people in daily situations and relationships outside the therapeutic setting (e.g., teachers, parents, partners).

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Reinhard Tausch

Original Work Citation

Tausch, R. (2007, Spring). Promoting health: Challenges for person-centered communication in psychotherapy, counseling and human relationships in daily life. Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapies, 6(1), 1-13. doi:10.1080/14779757.2007.9688424

Collection

Citation

“Promoting health: Challenges for person-centered communication in psychotherapy, counseling and human relationships in daily life,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed November 18, 2019, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18611.

Output Formats