A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for boys with conduct problems

Description

Suggests that trauma contributes to the development and persistence of conduct problems, and should be addressed. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) was selected as a promising trauma treatment. 29 boys with conduct problems in residential or day treatment were randomized into standard care or standard care plus 3 trauma-focused EMDR sessions. The EMDR group showed large and significant reduction of memory-related distress, as well as trends towards reduction of post-traumatic symptoms. The EMDR group also showed large and significant reduction of problem behaviors by 2-month follow-up, whereas the control group showed only slight improvement. These findings provide support for EMDR's use as a trauma treatment for boys ages 10-16 years, as well as support for the hypothesis that effective trauma treatment can lead to reduced conduct problems in this population.

Format

Book Section

Language

English

Author(s)

Glenn B. Soberman
Ricky Greenwald
David L. Rule

Original Work Citation

Soberman, G. B., Greenwald, R., & Rule, D. L. (2002). A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for boys with conduct problems. In R. Greenwald (Ed), Trauma and juvenile delinquency: Theory, research, and interventions (pp. 217-236). Binghamton, NY: Haworth Maltreatment and Trauma Press/The Haworth Press

Collection

Citation

“A controlled study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for boys with conduct problems,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 29, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18624.

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