The railway experience: 'Being in control' the non-disclosure of traumatic memory content and what the EMDR clinician can do

Description

The very thought of not being in control of an experience is, to some clients/employees, an incredibly difficult concept to grasp. Train drivers who, like ship's captains and aeroplane pilots, have very specific roles and responsibilities have undergone training which will have included specific operational, legal and social requirements to 'be in control at all times'. Even, it would appear, when their beliefs are shattered such as in the case of train drivers and railway suicides. Clinically this situation presents as a wish to presewe the belief of 'being in control' by not disclosing memories. This could cause problems with clients being labelled as non-compliant or dropping out of treatment. A technique for using EMDR tlgt allows treatment to proceed under these circumstances is described, the experience being gained during the treatment of 28 traumatised train crew who wished to 'remain in control' of their traumatic memories (i.e. not disclose traumatic experiences even to the therapist), because - as it transpired -of emotions of shame, guilt, and embarrassment or perceptions of blame. The second part of the presentation gives delegates a mini-practicum experience to try the technique out for themselves under the auspices of two EMDR Consultants.

Format

Conference

Language

English

Author(s)

David C. Blore
E. Manda Holmshaw

Original Work Citation

Blore, D. C., & Holmshaw, E. M. (2006, March). The railway experience: 'Being in control' the non-disclosure of traumatic memory content and what the EMDR clinician can do. Presentation at the 4th EMDR Association UK & Ireland Annual Conference, London, UK

Collection

Citation

“The railway experience: 'Being in control' the non-disclosure of traumatic memory content and what the EMDR clinician can do,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 22, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/18868.

Output Formats