Does naturally occurring EMDR-like phenomena in the work environment increase employment risk for survivors of violent crimes?

Description

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a controversial yet exciting therapy that assists many, including survivors of violent crimes to process their experiences so that they can move forward in their healing. The therapist deliberately stimulates left-right brain processing while facilitating an environment similar to that experienced while dreaming. It is particularly effective in treating people with post traumatic stress disorder.

While this carefully constructed set of circumstances is beneficial in the hands of a qualified EMDR practitioner and in a safe environment, is it possible that the very factors which lead to healing in EMDR therapy present themselves unawares outside the clinical environment causing post-traumatic stress episodes? The actual triggers leading to a post traumatic stress episode vary, but perhaps upon inspection a naturally occurring commonality mimicking the EMDR phenomenon is present.
Although eye movements are the most commonly used external stimulus employed by EMDR therapists, they also use auditory tones, tapping, or other types of tactile stimulation. Are there naturally occurring corollaries in the everyday environment which would make it difficult for a survivor of violent crime to function in their day to day duties? Are work tasks unknowingly triggering the beginnings of an EMDR session without the presence of an EMDR practitioner to facilitate the information processing? Is a post-traumatic stress response the result? Survivors of violent crimes are at high risk for employment. Does Naturally Occurring EMDR-Like Phenomena in the Work Environment Increase Employment Risk for Survivors of Violent Crimes?

Format

Other

Language

English

Author(s)

K. Tate

Original Work Citation

Tate, K. (2003). Does naturally occurring EMDR-like phenomena in the work environment increase employment risk for survivors of violent crimes? Mental Health Santuary. Retrieved from http://www.naturalhealthweb.com/articles/tate1.html on 3/29/2013

Collection

Citation

“Does naturally occurring EMDR-like phenomena in the work environment increase employment risk for survivors of violent crimes?,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed August 12, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/19123.

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