Changes in psychological symptoms and heart rate variability during EMDR treatment: A case series of subthreshold PTSD

Description

Elevated psychophysiological parameters and heightened physiological reactivity to trauma-related cues are acquired changes following trauma exposure. Measuring improvement in these variables is an appropriate evaluation of outcome in treatment studies. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a computerized measure of physiological responsivity derived from Holter ECG recording. Four female outpatients with persistent post-traumatic symptoms and personal impairment following “small t” trauma exposure underwent a course of EMDR treatment and were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, day 30 and day 90 of followup, using self-report symptom scales and 90-min Holter ECG recordings. Symptom scores decreased between baseline and end of treatment, with improvement maintained at follow-up. Several HRV measures changed favorably in different recording intervals. HRV is a feasible and sensitive method to measure physiological changes in the treatment of individuals distressed by “small t” trauma. Further investigation is advisable to expand these preliminary data.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Alessandra Frustaci 
Gaetano A. Lanza
Isabel Fernandez 
Massimo di Giannantonio
Gino Pozzi

Original Work Citation

Frustaci, A., Lanza, G. A., Fernandez, F., Giannantonio, M., & Pozzi, G. (2010). Changes in psychological symptoms and heart rate variability during EMDR treatment: A case series of subthreshold PTSD. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 4(1), 3-11. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.4.1.3

Collection

Citation

“Changes in psychological symptoms and heart rate variability during EMDR treatment: A case series of subthreshold PTSD,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 30, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/19636.

Output Formats