Taxing working memory during memory recall and the startle reflex

Description

A dual-task during recall of an emotional memory reduces its vividness and emotionality, which may be due to both tasks competing for limited working memory (WM) resources. The dose-response relationship between WM taxing during memory recall and its benefits was investigated. Additionally, the fear-potentiated startle reflex was measured to obtain more objective information about the expected decrease in vividness and emotionality. Participants recalled negative and positive memories while performing no dual-task, a moderately taxing dual-task (eye movements), or a very taxing dual-task (Tetris), after which vividness, emotionality and the startle reflex were measured. Compared to no dual-task, eye movements and Tetris similarly decreased image vividness and/or emotionality, and the startle reflex. The findings suggest a WM account of EMDR, which indicates that a concurrent task is beneficial because it taxes WM during memory recall; and that WM taxing during memory recall and its benefits are not linearly related.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Sophie L. van Uijen

Original Work Citation

van Uijen, S. L. (2010). Taxing working memory during memory recall and the startle reflex. (Master's thesis, Utrecht University). Retrieved from http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/student-theses/2010-0705(2002)16/UUindex.html

Collection

Citation

“Taxing working memory during memory recall and the startle reflex,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 22, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/20434.

Output Formats