A pilot study of concentrated EMDR: A brief report

Description

The current research used a quantitative single-case study design to investigate the effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) treatment for a participant diagnosed with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD), severe without psychotic features, and panic disorder with agoraphobia. Treatment frequency was three sessions per week, with twelve 90-minute reprocessing sessions provided over a period of 1 month; the study also evaluated this application of “concentrated EMDR.” At baseline, mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were 49 and 38, and at 3-month follow-up, the scores had decreased to 8 and 7 respectively. The results of this pilot study indicate that concentrated EMDR may be effective in treating comorbid MDD and panic disorder with agoraphobia. The study also evaluated the application of concentrated EMDR, with treatment frequency increased from one session to three sessions per week. Twelve 90-minute reprocessing sessions were provided over a period of 1 month. Results show the apparent effectiveness of concentrated EMDR.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Earl Grey

Original Work Citation

Grey, E. (2011). A pilot study of concentrated EMDR: A brief report. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 5(1), 14-24. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.5.1.14

Collection

Citation

“A pilot study of concentrated EMDR: A brief report,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 30, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/20757.

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