The feeling-state theory of behavioral and substance addictions and the feeling-state addiction protocol

Description

The Feeling-State Theory of Behavioral and Substance Addictions postulates that addiction (both behavioral and substance) are created when positive feelings become rigidly linked with specific objects or behavior. This linkage between feeling and behavior is called a feeling-state. When the feeling-state is triggered, the entire psycho-physiological pattern is activated. The activation of the pattern then triggers the out-of-control behavior.

(FSAT) combines the Feeling-State Theory of Behavioral and Substance Addiction with a modified form of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). EMDR has been shown to be effective in the treatment of Posttraumatic Stress disorder and other trauma-based disorders (Rothbaum, 1997; Shapiro, 1989; Van der Kolk et al., 2007). Just as EMDR can process traumas, clinical experience suggests that a modified form of EMDR can also be used in the treatment of behavioral and substance addictions. The therapy is often brief, 5 to 6 sessions, and results indicate a profound change in behavior that is noticeable to patients as well as to their relatives and friends

Format

Other

Language

English

Author(s)

Robert Miller

Original Work Citation

Miller, R. (2011). The feeling-state theory of behavioral and substance addictions and the feeling-state addiction protocol. Author

Collection

Citation

“The feeling-state theory of behavioral and substance addictions and the feeling-state addiction protocol,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed November 25, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/21439.

Output Formats