A comparative experimental treatment outcome study: Female survivors of sexual assault suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and trauma-related guilt – self-report and psychophysiological measures

Description

Diverse psychotherapeutic approaches for treating trauma-related sequelae have emerged over the last several decades in response to the widespread prevalence of sexual assault and resultant posttraumatic stress disorder among women (PTSD). In a recent formal study (Grace, 2003), a newer treatment called one eye integration (OEI) has been shown to be effective for traumatized individuals. The purpose of this study was to build upon those findings by comparing the effectiveness of two treatments for reducing PTSD symptoms with a breathing, relaxation, autogenics, imagery, and grounding (BRAIN) control condition. Twenty-seven female rape or sexual assault survivors who met the criteria for PTSD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Text-Revision, (DSM-IV-TR; APA, 2000) were randomly assigned to three groups: (a) a neurologically-based therapy called OEI, (b) an information processing model referred to as cognitive processing therapy-revised (CPT-R), or (c) a control condition (BRAIN), PTSD, depression, and trauma-related guilt symptoms were assessed pretreatment, posttreatment and at 3-month follow up, and qualitative electroencephalography (qEEG) brainwave patterns of two regions of the scalp (frontal and parietal) were measured pre and posttreatment. The following dependent measures were used: Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), and t he Trauma-Related Guilt Inventory (TRGI). Though there were no significant differences in PTSD symptoms between groups from pretreatment to post treatment assessments, a significant difference occurred between pretreatment and 3-month follow up, with OEI manifesting greater reductions than CPT-R or BRAIN. There were no significant differences between groups in depression, but there was a reduction in BDI-II scores over time. Reduction in guilt-related symptoms occurred on several scales and subscales for all three groups over time from pretreatment of posttreatment assessments, though not significantly by group. A significant difference was found for the Global Guilt subscale at 3-month follow up, with greater improvement for the OEI group. Preliminary results from cortical brain activity assessments indicate typical qEEG asymmetry patterns for PTSD and depression, though there were no significant group differences apart from minor post hoc analyses. Implications of these findings for clinical work and directions for future research were discussed.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Karen Williams

Original Work Citation

Williams, K. (2006, August). A comparative experimental treatment outcome study: Female survivors of sexual assault suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and trauma-related guilt ? self-report and psychophysiological measures. Trinity Western University, Langley, British Columbia, CAN

Collection

Citation

“A comparative experimental treatment outcome study: Female survivors of sexual assault suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and trauma-related guilt – self-report and psychophysiological measures,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed May 28, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/21712.

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