Treatment of grief and mourning through EMDR: Conceptual considerations and clinical guidelines

Description

Introduction: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an empirically-supported psychotherapeutic approach for treating trauma, which is also applicable to a wide range of other experientially-based clinical complaints. It is particularly useful in treating grief and mourning. Literature findings: EMDR is guided by the Adaptive Information Processing Model (AIP), which conceptualizes the effects of traumatic experiences in terms of dysfunctional memory networks in a physiologically-based information processing system. Numerous empirical studies have demonstrated EMDR's efficacy. Discussion: The death of a loved one can be very distressing, with memories and experiences associated with the loss becoming dysfunctionally stored and preventing access to adaptive information, including positive memories of the deceased. EMDR can be utilized to integrate these distressing experiences and facilitate the assimilation and accommodation of the loss and movement through the mourning processes. Conclusion: Applying the eight phases of EMDR to grief and mourning can yield potent clinical results in the aftermath of loss.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Roger Solomon
Therese A. Rando

Original Work Citation

Solomon, R., & Rando, T. A. (2012). Treatment of grief and mourning through EMDR: Conceptual considerations and clinical guidelines. Revue Europenne De Psychologie Applique/European Review of Applied Psychology, 62(4), 231-239. doi:10.1016/j.erap.2012.09.002

Collection

Citation

“Treatment of grief and mourning through EMDR: Conceptual considerations and clinical guidelines,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed July 9, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/21750.

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