The feeling-state theory and the feeling-state addiction protocol

Description

Substance and behavioral addictions such as gambling compulsions, sex addictions, and smoking have been notoriously resistant to treatment. The Feeling-State Theory (FST) of Addiction presents a new understanding of the etiology of addiction. FST hypothesizes that addictions are caused by a fixation of a positive feeling event. Afterwards, whenever the person wants to feel that feel-good feeling, the link with that particular behavior is triggered. With this new understanding of addictive behavior, the Feeling-State Addiction Protocol (FSAP) uses a modified form of Eye Movement Desensitization (EMDR) to break the fixation, resulting in a complete resolution of behavioral addictions and the elimination of the urges and cravings of substance addictions, usually within 4 to 5 sessions. The resolution for behavioral addictions is so complete that, for example, a gambler can actually return to gambling without activating the compulsion. The presentation will explicate the FST hypothesis, present research data, case histories, and describe the process of utilizing the FSAP. (Introductory – 75% EMDR) Learning objectives: • Participants will be able to explain the Feeling-State Theory of Behavioral and Substance Addiction and the underlying etiology of addictions as understood by this approach. • Participants will be able to name 3 differences between the standard EMDR protocol and the Feeling-State Addictions Protocol. • Participants will be able to name the 3 sets of beliefs targeted for comprehensive treatment using the FSAP within the EMDR protocol. • Participants will be able to explain how to use the FSAP for both behavioral and substance addictions.

Format

Conference

Language

English

Author(s)

Robert Miller

Original Work Citation

Miller, R. (2013, May). The feeling-state theory and the feeling-state addiction protocol. Presentation at the EMDR Canada Annual Conference, Banff, AB

Collection

Citation

“The feeling-state theory and the feeling-state addiction protocol,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed November 25, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/21936.

Output Formats