Methodological aspects of cognitive rehabilitation with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)

Description

A variety of nervous system components such as medulla, pons, midbrain, cerebellum, basal ganglia, parietal, frontal and occipital lobes have role in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) processes. The eye movement is done simultaneously for attracting client's attention to an external stimulus while concentrating on a certain internal subject. Eye movement guided by therapist is the most common attention stimulus. The role of eye movement has been documented previously in relation with cognitive processing mechanisms. A series of systemic experiments have shown that the eyes’ spontaneous movement is associated with emotional and cognitive changes and results in decreased excitement, flexibility in attention, memory processing, and enhanced semantic recalling. Eye movement also decreases the memory's image clarity and the accompanying excitement. By using EMDR, we can reach some parts of memory which were inaccessible before and also emotionally intolerable. Various researches emphasize on the effectiveness of EMDR in treating and curing phobias, pains, and dependent personality disorders. Consequently, due to the involvement of multiple neural system components, this palliative method of treatment can also help to rehabilitate the neuro-cognitive system.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Afsaneh Zarghi
Alireza Zali
Mehdi Tehranidost

Original Work Citation

Zarghi, A., Zali, A., & Tehranidost, M. (2013, February). Methodological aspects of cognitive rehabilitation with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, 4(1), 97-103

Collection

Citation

“Methodological aspects of cognitive rehabilitation with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR),” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed December 3, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/21988.

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