Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in conjoint couples therapy: A grounded theory study

Description

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an evidence-based
treatment for trauma, which is primarily conducted in the context of individual therapy (Shapiro, 2001). Although it has been incorporated into couples and family therapy in recent years (e.g., Capps, 2006; Errebo & Sommers-Flanagan, 2007; Litt, 2008, 2010; Moses, 2003, 2007; Protinsky, Flemke, & Sparks, 2001; Protinsky, Sparks, & Flemke, 2001), limited research has examined its use within conjoint couples therapy and none has included interviews with couples and therapists to explore this treatment modality. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the experience of clients and therapists during conjoint EMDR. Interviews were conducted with 21 participants including seven couples who participated in conjoint EMDR as well as their therapists. These interviews were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin’s (1998) grounded theory data analysis. The theory developed from the data, EMDR in Conjoint Couples Therapy: Relational Trauma Treatment Theory, provides perspectives not captured in previous research about the experience of conjoint EMDR and offers guidance about assessment and preparation procedures.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Elizabeth Legg

Original Work Citation

Legg, E. (2013, August). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in conjoint couples therapy: A grounded theory study. (Dissertation, University of Northern Colorado)

Collection

Citation

“Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in conjoint couples therapy: A grounded theory study,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 30, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/22401.

Output Formats