EMDR therapy humanitarian trauma recovery interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean

Description

This article presents an overview of the eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) Humanitarian Trauma Recovery Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean and provides the reader with clinical stories from the front lines. During our many years working in the field, we have observed that psychological trauma is a challenging consequence of the multifaceted situations confronting individuals and communities after disasters. In this article, we describe the EMDR humanitarian interventions provided since 1998 in Latin America and the Caribbean to address survivors' psychological distress after natural disasters (e.g., flooding, landslides, earthquakes), man-made disasters, human massacre, and severe interpersonal violence. Treatment has been provided to child, adolescent, and adult survivors, often in community settings, and to first responders and cancer patients. The EMDR early intervention protocols are brief effective interventions that can be used in the field or emergency situations; there is a body of research supporting the use of modified EMDR therapy protocols to treat acute trauma in both group and individual formats (Jarero, Artigas, & Luber, 2011).

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Ignacio Jarero
Lucina Artigas
Susana Uribe
Alaide Miranda

Original Work Citation

Jarero, I., Artigas, L., Uribe, S., & Miranda, A. (2014). EMDR therapy humanitarian trauma recovery interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 8(4), 260-268. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.8.4.260

Collection

Citation

“EMDR therapy humanitarian trauma recovery interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed October 19, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/23056.

Output Formats