The frustrated and helpless healer: Pathways approaches to posttraumatic stress disorders

Description

Posttraumatic stress disorder is a psychophysiological disorder, characterized by the following: chronic sympathetic nervous activation; persisting perceptual/sensory vigilance for threats; recurrent distressing memories of the event, including intrusive memories, flashbacks lived as if in the present moment, and nightmares; and a persisting negative emotional state including fear and shame. The psychophysiological basis for this disorder calls for psychophysiologically based interventions. This article presents the case narrative of a 29-year-old national guardsman, exposed to combat trauma and later to civilian trauma in public safety work. His treatment followed the Pathways model, comprised of multimodal interventions, beginning with self-directed behavioral changes, then the acquisition of skills (including self-hypnosis), and finally professional treatment including clinical hypnosis and EMDR.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Donald Moss

Original Work Citation

Moss, D. (2017, July-September). The frustrated and helpless healer: Pathways approaches to posttraumatic stress disorders. The International Journal Of Clinical And Experimental Hypnosis, 65 (3), 336-352. doi:10.1080/00207144.2017.1314744

Collection

Citation

“The frustrated and helpless healer: Pathways approaches to posttraumatic stress disorders,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed July 29, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/24579.

Output Formats