Comparison of eye movement desensitization reprocessing and cognitive behavioral therapy as adjunctive treatments for recurrent depression: the European Depression EMDR Network (EDEN) randomized controlled trial

Description

Background:
Treatment of recurrent depressive disorders is currently only moderately successful. Increasing evidence suggests a significant relationship between adverse childhood experiences and recurrent depressive disorders, suggesting that trauma-based interventions could be useful for these patients.

Objectives:
To investigate the efficacy of EMDR in addition to antidepressant medication in treating recurrent depression.

Design:
A non-inferiority, single-blind, randomized clinical controlled trial comparing EMDR or CBT as adjunctive treatments to antidepressant medication. Randomization was carried out by a central computer system. Allocation was carried out by a study coordinator in each center.

Setting:
Two psychiatric services, one in Italy and one in Spain.

Participants:
Eighty-two patients were randomized with a 1:1 ratio to the EMDR group (n=40) or CBT group (n=42). Sixty-six patients, 31 in the EMDR group and 35 in the CBT group, were included in the completers analysis.

Intervention:
15±3 individual sessions of EMDR or CBT, both in addition to antidepressant medication. Participants were followed up at six-months.

Main outcome measure:
Rate of depressive symptoms remission in both groups, as measured by a BDI-II score <13.

Results:
Sixty-six patients were analyzed as completers (31 EMDR vs. 35 CBT). No significant difference between the two groups was found either at the end of the interventions (71% EMDR vs. 48.7% CBT) or at the six-month follow-up (54.8% EMDR vs. 42.9% CBT). A RM-ANOVA on BDI-II scores showed similar reductions over time in both groups (F(6, 59) = 22.501, p< .001) and a significant interaction effect between time and group (F(6, 59) = 3.357, p= .006), with lower BDI-II scores in the EMDR group at T1 (mean difference= -7.309 (95% CI [- 12.811, -1.806]), p= .010). The RM-ANOVA on secondary outcome measures showed similar improvement over time in both groups (F(14, 51) = 8.202, p< .001), with no significant differences between groups (F(614, 51) = 0.642, p= .817).

Conclusion:
Although these results can be considered preliminary only, this study suggests that EMDR could be a viable and effective treatment for reducing depressive symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients with recurrent depression.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Luca Ostacoli
Sara Carletto
Marco Cavallo
Paula Baldomir-Gago
Giorgio Di Lorenzo
Isabel Fernandez
Michael Hase
Ania Justo-Alonse
Maria Lehnung
Giuseppe Migliaretti
Francesco Oliva
Marco Pagani
Susana Recarey-Eiris
Riccardo Torta
Visal Tumani
Ana Isabel González-Vázquez
Arne Hofmann

Original Work Citation

Ostacoli, L., Careltto, S., Cavallo, M., Baldomir-Gago, P., Di Lorenzo, G., Fernandez, I., Hase, M.,...Hofmann, A. (2018, February). Comparison of eye movement desensitization reprocessing and cognitive behavioral therapy as adjunctive treatments for recurrent depression: the European Depression EMDR Network (EDEN) randomized controlled trial.  Frontiers in Psychology. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00074

Collection

Citation

“Comparison of eye movement desensitization reprocessing and cognitive behavioral therapy as adjunctive treatments for recurrent depression: the European Depression EMDR Network (EDEN) randomized controlled trial,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed September 27, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/24777.

Output Formats