Does modality-specific working memory taxation matter?

Description

This study investigated whether modality-specific dual tasks have more impact on the working memory (WM) during memory recall than a modality-non-specific dual task. The first model proposed that modality-specific dual task is superior to a modality-non-specific dual task in WM taxation. The second model proposed that modality-specific dual task and a modality-non-specific dual task have an equivalent impact on the WM. The third model proposed that there is a WM taxation regardless the modality of the dual task. The study had a three (Memory recall: Visual, Auditory and No memory recall) by two (Dual Task: responding to a Tone or Circle) within-subject design, with the reaction time (RT) as a dependent variable. Ninety-six participants were recruited at Utrecht University. The results showed that there was a WM taxation regardless of the modality of the dual task. The RT’s on the dual tasks appears to slow down when participants held a memory in mind. This effect was substantial when there was a match between the nature of the dual task and the recalled memory. Furthermore, the Bayes Factor (BF) indicates that the data was approximately ten times (BF12 = 10.04) more likely to occur under the hypothesis 1 than under hypothesis 2. The outcomes of this study indicate that using a dual task during memory recall will have an impact on the WM taxation. Whilst taxing the appropriate subsystem of the WM with a modality-specific dual task will lead to a greater WM taxation.

Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Language

English

Author(s)

Timothy John Antonio Thodé

Original Work Citation

Thodé, T. J. A. (2018, January). Does modality-specific working memory taxation matter? (Master's thesis, Utrecht University)

Collection

Citation

“Does modality-specific working memory taxation matter?,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed February 24, 2021, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/25029.

Output Formats