EMDR - Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy and religious faith among orthodox Jewish (Haredi) women

Description

Background:
This article looks at a topic that could be of value to psychiatrists and psychologists interested in the impacts of religious cognitions on well-being: religious coping beliefs occurring spontaneously in EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy), and the reported impact of EMDR on these beliefs.

Method:
The article offers brief vignettes of six haredi women, focussing on changes in religious faith from trauma and trauma (EMDR) therapy. It includes transcripts from EMDR.

Results:
Religious faith was shaken by trauma and generally felt to be restored in EMDR. The spontaneous appearance of experiences of religious faith was evident in EMDR transcripts as therapy proceeded. The study involved solely women from a specific religious-cultural group. Effects need to be explored in other groups. More specific questioning before and after therapy could help to throw light on the direction of effects.

Conclusions:
Further exploration of the interactions between trauma, EMDR and religious coping beliefs would be worthwhile, in a range of cultural-religious groups. Trauma suffering can involve major religious struggles and doubts.

Format

Journal

Language

English

Author(s)

Kate Miriam Loewenthal

Original Work Citation

Loewenthal, K. M. (2019). EMDR - Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy and religious faith among orthodox Jewish (Haredi) women. Israeli Journal of Psychiatry, 56(2), 20-27.

Collection

Citation

“EMDR - Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy and religious faith among orthodox Jewish (Haredi) women,” Francine Shapiro Library, accessed March 28, 2020, https://emdria.omeka.net/items/show/26222.

Output Formats